The 20 most read articles on Microgrid Knowledge ever

Share Button

Microgrid Knowledge is coming up on its eighth anniversary. So we thought it would be a good time to take a look at what topics our readers find most interesting. We reviewed the entire eight years. Here are the 20 most read articles on Microgrid Knowledge since we began.

most read articles on Microgrid Knowledge

By nialowwa/Shutterstock.com

We’ve never before analyzed readership over such a broad sweep.

1

What is a microgrid? 

A microgrid is a self-sufficient energy system that serves a discrete geographic footprint, such as a college campus, hospital complex, business center or neighborhood. Here’s what we mean by that.

2

What does a microgrid cost?

When asked, “What does a microgrid cost?” ABB’s Nathan Adams responds, “What does a house cost?” Just as houses span from builder basic to celebrity mansion, microgrids range in size and sophistication.

3

Solar is good. Solar microgrids are better

It’s a surprise to many when they learn that their grid-connected solar panels cannot keep the lights on during a power outage. The problem is partially due to semantics. Many people do not yet understand the difference between solar and a solar microgrid.

4

Microgrid benefits: Eight ways a microgrid will improve your operation … and the world 

Microgrids serve industries, institutions, communities and other customers in a range of ways. Here we look at eight main microgrid benefits — from keeping the lights on in a storm to lowering energy costs to improving community well-being.

5

What is a virtual power plant?

A virtual power plant turns on its head the traditional idea of relying on big, centralized power plants for predictable power. But what is it exactly? And who uses virtual power plants and why?  

6

The microgrid way: Going green with solar & supercapacitor-based energy storage

Supercapacitor-based energy storage stores energy on the surface of the electrolyte, which means there is no chemical reaction.

7

 Schneider and Carlyle form new venture to pursue fast-growing energy infrastructure and microgrid market

The Carlyle Group and Schneider Electric announced a joint venture, AlphaStruxure, to pursue what they see as a $1 trillion underinvestment in US infrastructure and a fast-growing market for microgrids.

8

Microgrids 101: A non-geek definition of microgrid

A modern day microgrid is a mini version of the electric grid – except usually smarter and more efficient. So before we provide a definition of microgrid, we need to define “the grid.”

9

Shouldn’t we have more DC microgrids?

Direct current (DC) microgrids offer a lot of advantages in today’s digitally networked, electrified world. Yet they face challenges gaining acceptance on the US grid where alternating current dominates.

10

It’s dark in California but the message is clear: More microgrids needed

The power outages to 738,000 electric customers illustrated that even California, one of the lead states deploying microgrids, is not building them quickly enough.

11

What are non-wires alternatives?

Non-wires alternatives use distributed energy resources and microgrids to defer or replace the installation of more traditional “wires and poles” infrastructure.

12

What Schneider Electric’s recent move reveals about the microgrid market

To understand the movement of the microgrid industry, it’s instructive to watch its large players, particularly, right now, Schneider Electric. The company has been navigating the industry’s tributaries for the last five years and seems to be signaling it sees an ocean ahead.

13

Are microgrids expensive?

Asking “are microgrids expensive?” is a bit like asking what rocks cost. Are we talking about diamonds or driveway gravel?

14

What’s driving microgrids toward a $30.9B market?

A forecast issued by Navigant Research identifies several new trends emerging in the global microgrid market as it moves toward becoming a $30.9 billion industry by 2027.

15

The spectrum of resiliency – What role does energy storage play in a microgrid?

Ameresco’s Benjamin Lavoie explores the role that energy storage plays in a microgrid, and what this means for resiliency efforts. 

16

Hydrogen becomes more viable as a microgrid fuel

Hydrogen is becoming more viable as a microgrid fuel source, although few hydrogen microgrids exist yet and cost remains a challenge, industry members say.

17

22 intriguing microgrid projects to watch in 2022

The microgrid industry has been busy — there was no shortage of projects to choose from. In fact, our initial list netted twice what we needed. Since it’s 2022 not 2044, we had to do some serious culling.

18

California’s largest utility seeks 20 microgrids to ward off wildfire-related power outages

Racing to beat California’s next wildfire season, Pacific Gas & Electric is seeking companies to install microgrids near 20 substations.

19

History of microgrids in the US: From Pearl Street to plug-and-play

While it may seem that microgrids are new, the history of microgrids shows they have been around in some form for years in the US — although they haven’t always been called microgrids. The first one was introduced by Thomas Edison in 1882 at his Pearl Street Station, which combined heat and power and produced electricity and thermal energy.

20

Texas on the verge of an energy catastrophe: How microgrids are helping

Struggling to keep the grid from collapse, the grid operator has instituted rolling blackouts, causing millions of Texans to lose electricity as bitter cold sweeps the state. Meant to last minutes, the power outages are elongating into hours and possibly days.

Thank you for being a Microgrid Knowledge reader. Please subscribe to our free newsletter for a fresh take on microgrids three times a week.

Share Button

About Elisa Wood

Elisa Wood is the chief editor of MicrogridKnowledge.com. She has been writing about energy for more than three decades for top industry publications. Her work also has been picked up by CNN, the New York Times, Reuters, the Wall Street Journal Online and the Washington Post.

Leave a Comment

*